How to Stop the World From Crushing Your Sensitive Children

Your sensitive children are the helpers on the playground. Your sensitive children are the first ones to notice when other people cry. She is kindhearted. He is considerate. They go out of their way to make sure everyone is happy. They look for your approval, their teacher’s approval.

Their heart is big. Their armor is small.


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They are crushed when people are mean to them. They are confused when others go out of their way to be cruel. They are devastated when they think they have disappointed anyone.

The same wonderful qualities that make your child kindhearted are crushing your child’s spirit and optimism.

How do you raise sensitive children to survive in the harsh world around them? To handle the cruelness of other kids – the harsh tones parents and teachers sometimes deliver?

I have worked with some of the most giving, loving and caring children in my practice. Their hearts are wide open. So wide open that they come wounded into my office – from a world that isn’t as kind as them.

Unfortunately, the world isn’t changing anytime soon.



Just like athletic skills or academic skills – emotional intelligence is not evenly distributed among children (or adults for that matter). Some people lack the ability to empathize. Sometimes this can turn into callousness and sometimes it can turn into something far worse.

Highly sensitive children do not get this at first. It is a harsh lesson that they start to learn as they go through school. At first there may be wonder and concern about why another child would be mean to them. I explain it to kids this way:

Unfortunately, there will always be a sprinkle of mean kids in your classes. This world is full of really thoughtful, kindhearted people and a sprinkle of mean spirited people. Some kids like to be cruel. You can be the nicest person on this planet – but some mean spirited kids are still going to find it fun to be cruel to you.

The good news is kindhearted people outnumber the mean hearted people. So for the three or four mean kids you might encounter each school year – they’ll be just as many kindhearted people silently wishing you the best.


Teach your sensitive children how to avoid being targets. Their natural personality doesn’t come with any armor – which makes them very vulnerable. Bullies look for big reactions. Unfortunately, sensitive children often have a hard time containing their sadness. They also don’t typically fight back.

They will need to develop skills to handle these situations – as their natural instincts aren’t going to help. For some tips on how to help your sensitive children with bullies click here.


Sensitive children often thinks things are directed at them–even when the situation has nothing to do with them.

When the teacher has scolded the class – they feel they are being personally attacked. When the teacher is disciplining the child sitting next to them – they feel they are being disciplined. Help your children reassess the situation. Teach them to look at whose behavior the teacher is really addressing.




I hear parents say over and over again, “She thinks I am yelling at her – when I’m just using a firm tone.” When you are stern they think you are shouting. When you redirect them they think you are scolding them. This can get frustrating and tiring.


Sensitive children aren’t crazy – they are just emotionally more open and sensitive. Some even have sensory issues. That being said – their experiences are magnified – and that, unfortunately, includes your tone.


Play fun games to help them learn the difference between firmness and yelling. You can play a guessing game and name it Being Firm or Yelling and get them to guess which one it is. Although this will seem obvious in the moment – it will help your sensitive children generalize the difference.




Usually sensitive children have wonderful memories. They archive everything you’ve ever said to them along with every negative experience.

Some of us can watch a disturbing TV show or play a violent video game without any residual effect. Sensitive children often have an unusually good visual memory. I often hear sensitive children complain to me that they just can’t get the scary or upsetting image “out of their head.”


Teach your sensitive children how their brain files away upsetting material for later. Teach them how their brain doesn’t have a separate file for fantasy or fiction.

Their subconscious brain is filing all that they see in one ever growing disturbing file. A file that will be reviewed late at night or when a similar situation pops up.


Once your children understand the impact those disturbing images have on their brain – they will begin to be more careful about what they watch. In the meanwhile, you might have to do that for them.


Sensitive children are the most beautiful and considerate children I have ever met. They fill my office with love and understanding. If you can teach your sensitive children how to overcome some of the above obstacles –they will blossom bigger than the rest of us!



Do you have sensitive children at home? Do you have some tips for other parents on how to help sensitive children?


Do you know someone who has sensitive children and who can benefit from these tips? Share the article with them!


Do you know an anxious teen? Give them the only self-help book teens are likely to read:

Finally a teen anxiety book that teens will want to read!


Visit Anxious Toddlers’s profile on Pinterest.

2 responses to “How to Stop the World From Crushing Your Sensitive Children”


    Others would even suggest that I need to teach her how to “build and put up that internal wall.”
    Well that’s an interesting suggestion that I’d like to consider, but how would I go about doing so?

    I’d always ask and end up hearing stories about the unfortunate events which have eventually led to their calloused hearts. I end up wide-eyed with an open mouth and feeling too bad to bring up the original matter at hand, aka my unanswered question. Then I leave with the conclusion that I either have to traumatize her, or seclude her from the world.

    Obviously, either won’t work. Lol.

    Anyway, could you please elaborate more on your first point, please?
    You mentioned “Perspective,” and Emotional Intelligence. I couldn’t quite get your point.

    I DO have an EI book that I have started and paused wayy too many times. Maybe I need to pick it back up.

    Thanks in advance for everything!
    I am grateful for helpful people like you who strongly impact our lives!


    • Natasha Daniels says:

      Hi Vanessa,
      I am so glad you found the article helpful! To answer your question-

      Sensitive children have a high emotional intelligence. In fact they are usually gifted in this area. They can read people better. They can pick up on subtle social cues and can read emotions far quicker than the average person. This is a blessing and a curse.

      Most people don’t have those abilities. In fact, some kids are on the opposite end and lack emotional intelligence. These kids can often be cruel or can turn into bullies.

      You can help your children by letting them know that not everyone is as kind and as considerate as them (😥). Giving them perspective that the world is not filled with equally kind hearted people will help them not take other people’s behavior personally.

      One of the biggest struggles with sensitive children is the personalization of other people’s tone and impoliteness. Kids often wonder why the teacher had such a harsh tone or why a friend said something in a rude manner. Helping them depersonalize these situations will improve their ability to handle these moments.

      You can let them know that some people get in bad moods and it has nothing to do with them. Some people might be feeling stressed and take it out on others. Some kids aren’t polite and don’t realize their words can hurt other people’s feelings.

      By teaching them how other people work they can separate other people’s actions from their own self-worth.

      I hope that helps clarify what I was talking about. Thanks for the insightful question.

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